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20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
america are movies, tv, science, technology. they're not keen on democracy as america preaches it. heading into another four years of the obama administration, where are we, and why are we here, and how do we get somewhere else? what went wrong, what is going right, and what to do about it going forward? >> first of all, i do not think that favorability ratings and the pew surveys of evidence of whether we're doing something wrong or right. i think it is a huge mistake for anybody who practices public diplomacy to think that his or her job is to win a popularity contest. well i guess maybe some of us who were in the bush administration can take a certain pleasure in effect in 2008, the favorability ratings for the united states were higher in four out of the five surveyed arab countries -- i am not even going to bring that up. [laughter] and it is a big mistake. in my view, and what i tried to do during my short tenure as undersecretary, is try to focus attention on what public diplomacy can do to achieve specific ends that are part of their goals in foreign policy and national security po
as advances in military and defense technology. from last week, this runs just over an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome. my name is gideon and i'm the editor of foreign affairs and it is a wonderful privilege and honor and pleasure to be here again at the halifax from. foreign affairs is in the business of serious discussions by knowledgeable people with important issues, free and frank exchanges on the most important questions out there and that's actually the same business that halifax is and so we are delighted to be the media sponsor, and it is going to be fantastic weekend. let me just cut right to the chase. we have a fantastic panel, and more importantly, a great topic and a wonderful group with all of you as well and so let's get right to it. our panelists here, david singer of "the new york times," the former undersecretary deputy secretary of state for global affairs now a fellow at the center at harvard. the head of telefax holders distinguished sibling, the munich security conference where they have a great group. the point of the session is to do some big thinking on
for systems for r an d. science and technology. the benchmark needed in western pacific. there's a whole pan plea of means which we will rebalance. ships are important they are good measure. there's more as we look forward the future and we meet the requirements of our defense strategic guidance in the regard. so having laid that out, i commend that to you as our future and how we see things today as we prepare our budget for fiscal year 14. it's to support the theafort i mentioned to you. i think we're on track and prepared to meet our national security commitment to the regard and the defense strategic guidance. thank you very much. i look forward to your questions. [applause] your article in foreign policy speaks to balancing the force. how do international navies play in to your stag -- strategy? >> the international navy play in to the descrat gi by mission. i think and by alliances that we've had. let me speak to the alliance. i just spoke to the western pacific, the japanese maritime self-defense force plays a we cooperate with them to share what we call long range track mission there
a major, new bold investment program, going into a new market, expanding a new technology, ect., you are worried about what the tax rate will be when that's generates cash in nine years. the best thing to do is create a lower rate, an expectation that there's not giant tax increases later. >> i agree with that. i think we should do in, but, a, you know we have the highest statutory right and no higher than average effective rates because we have the narrowest base of owl corporate income in the world. >> yeah. >> one of the reasons we have that system is because people like us argued for many years that the more efficient thing, the more, the better way to encourage investment was not to cut the corporate rate, but to have massively accelerated depreciation, expansion of investment, focusing on incentives rather than cutting the rate overall. i think the intuition is changing, but the way we're going it cut the rate is not by closing loopholes, but come out a painful expansions of the base like getting rid of accelerated depreciation and things which have a value so i think -- >> is
will take money from the airline industry that would otherwise be invested in nextgen technologies and the purchase of new aircraft, two proven methods for improving environmental performance and for reducing emissions. airlines for america and air transport trade association testified before our aviation subcommittee last year that the extraction of capital from the aviation system as enadviceaged under the e.u.'s emission trading scheme could threaten over 78,000 american jobs. this is unacceptable. but despite serious legal issues and ons -- objections by the international community, the european union is pressing ahead with its plans. in september, 2012, 21 countries, including the united states, signed a joint declaration against the e.u. emissions trading scheme in new delhi, india. the last year there have been several other multinational meetings of countries who oppose the scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illeg
in the development of state of the art oil spill prevention and response technologies, education research and training. and more than $1 billion will go to the united states coast guard trust fund to be available for clean up and compensation for those affected by oil spills in the gulf and throughout the united states. now as part of its guilty plea b.p. will retain a monitor for four years who will oversee safety and maintenance in regard to drilling in the gulf as well as an independent auditor who will conduct annual reviews to ensure compliance with the terms of this agreement. the company will hire an ethics monitor to improve it's its conduct and foster robust cooperation with the government. now there can be no question that this historic announcement is a critical step forward and under scores the justice determination to stand with gulf coast communities. in february the settlement tote ling $90 million related to the company's clean water act liability for the deep water horizon disaster. and approximately $45 million of this total will go directly to the gulf in the form of pe
with technology, to keep up with equipment, to get the latest, to make sure that there itheir infrastructure is in place to serve the country. >> that's why i like it's a class action lawsuit instead of independent complaints. those happen as we know all the time. but a class action like this will get major media attention, will get us all talking about it, and if they prevail i'm hoping that other utility companies around the country will say, you know, we probably don't want to have the same thing happen to us as what happened on long island, let's make sure we do something right. rick: class action lawsuits play an important role in the legal system. don't they usually result in a big payday for the lawyers and not necessarily for the people who sign onto it? >> it's a two-step process. yes they've got to be certified as a class action. they have to make sure everybody is in the same class. i don't think there is a problem there you have everybody on long island suffering from the same thing. you're right, will the lawyer win 30, 40%, yes, okay, that is not great, but let me explain a cla
poorly on the president? >> i'm afraid i blame everything on technology. i don't think this is an unusual thing to happen. it's just that we have a complete electronic trail. i think for thousands of years you've had adultery and all these things. >> brian: you're talk being the actual act. i'm talking about the president knowing. >> i'm also saying i don't think the president would know. you wouldn't have the f.b.i. investigating the c.i.a. if you didn't have all this electronic trail to follow. i don't think you would have all that. >> brian: but this is something that results in some type of blackmail in. >> yes. >> brian: that's the -- >> that's the problem. you have peter king, chairman of the homeland security committee in the house suggesting that perhaps general petraeus' testimony to them was compromised, briefing was compromised. >> brian: because that testimony included? >> the cover-up line about benghazi, which is that this was somehow part of a massive mob stimulated by the -- >> brian: a democrat said this hit me like a lightning bolt. they should have been briefed. >> we k
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)